Interview with Adey

Hi Adey I know you’re a polyhedral artist: a choreographer, a performer a fine art photographer…. and what else more?
Hi,
Well I have always been fascinated by all the visual arts and feel they are all connected in one way or another. Motion picture is a huge inspiration to my works and I also experiment with cinematography from time to time.

When did you first know that you wanted to be also a photographer?

I think even before I was studying performance arts I had a desire to make pictures. For me it has felt like a very organic transition into fine art photography.

You work with the human body. What do you see in it? Why do you love using it more than faces?
In a sense it’s much easier to show expression and emotion through the face but the body has so much to say. I like to breakdown gender roles and talk about how the body interacts with others and the surroundings. My images are not about the individual but more often about collective questions of perception.

How do you find the people for your photos and how do you convince them to be featured naked in your projects?
I would say around 70% of the models are friends and the others are people I meet and am inspired to shoot. Hmmmm to convince…. I just ask really nicely and sometimes buy them a drink or 2 Emoticon wink

Let’s talk about your creative process. First of all what kind of camera do you use most and how do you come up with ideas for a new photo? How many shots on average do you take to complete your project?
I mix between 2 cameras, a Hasselblad H2 and a Fujifilm GF670.
There are a number of ways I approach a new shoot. Either I see a location I like and fit the models to that or meet someone and have a vision of a scenario around them. Sometimes I also see images in my head and wait for the location and model to come together.
I shoot very little as its all shot on 120 film. The maximum rolls I would use is 4-5 in one shoot but often shoot less. Film isn’t getting any cheaper Emoticon wink I also develope and scan all the work by myself.
The process is very time consuming but ultimately rewarding.

 

Morphosis Series : Translation © Adey
Morphosis Series : Translation © Adey

 

Morphosis Series : Threshold © Adey
Morphosis Series : Threshold © Adey

 

Morphosis Series : Scent Marking © Adey
Morphosis Series : Scent Marking © Adey

 

Morphosis Series : Replaceble © Adey
Morphosis Series : Replaceble © Adey

 

Morphosis Series : Irreplaceable © Adey
Morphosis Series : Irreplaceable © Adey

 

Morphosis Series : Hibernate © Adey
Morphosis Series : Hibernate © Adey

 

Morphosis Series : Force Majeure © Adey
Morphosis Series : Force Majeure © Adey

 

Morphosis Series : Emergency © Adey
Morphosis Series : Emergency © Adey

 

Morphosis Series : Bear The Weight © Adey
Morphosis Series : Bear The Weight © Adey

 

Morphosis Series : Ascension © Adey
Morphosis Series : Ascension © Adey

 

Morphosis Series : Are You Sure? © Adey
Morphosis Series : Are You Sure? © Adey

When you do a shooting, how much of it is instinctual versus planned?Do you plan a lot or rely on spontaneous moments?
Before I start a shoot I have clear idea’s that I would like to try. Every photoshoot I do however always develops to improvisation with the model and surroundings. Sometimes we finish far from our starting point or we go full circle and end where we started.

You have more than 21,3k followers on Instagram. How has social media played a role in your photography?
Social media can be a great way to share your art and communicate with others in the photographic community. Even though I’m not the biggest fan of other social media platforms I do understand the value they hold within the artist network. My images have been seen by people from many different cultures that previously I may not have been able to connect with.

What do you think about censorship and have social media ever banned or reported as inappropriate any of your photos?
I have images deleted all the time. There was a pattern in the beginning whenever I shared an image of 2 nude men embracing it would be removed. That was depressing at times as I felt the world hasn’t moved on but then my art is also about challenging social norms.
As for censorship it’s a difficult thing. I don’t think I should have to censor my work but I do wonder what Instagram would look like with no censorship rules. I just wish there was less work objectifying the human body and more work with something to say!

So two nude men embracing together is an uncomfortable image for someone. Do you purposefully present lgbt content in your photos to assist in the thematic message, or is it more something that comes naturally to you as an artist?
It’s definitely something that comes naturally but obviously I’m aware of the message and discussion it may cause. I’m interested in what is at odds with the normal and portraying a world where these definitions no longer exist.

A Last question Adey : What advice would you give someone approaching naked photography?
Advice?????…… Well I would say know your reasons for shooting nude photography and constantly question your own art. The work needs to have a voice and resonate with those that view it. Respect your models and location and get out and shoot! Oh and hot tea and blankets are a must!!!!!

 

check out more ADEY’s  photos here

https://www.instagram.com/__adey__/

http://floret.se/adey/

http://adey.se

Buy Adey’s poster here http://www.vaslisouza.com/product/adey-poster-right-and-left/

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